No. Just No.

024210-120818-rev-blue-poles
Jackson Pollock’s Number 11, 1952, also known as Blue Poles

Liberal Senator James Paterson reckons that the National Gallery of Australia should sell one of it’s best-loved paintings – Jackson Pollock’s Blue Poles.  Bought in 1973 for the then record price of $1.3 million, the painting is now estimated to be worth around $350 million. “It’s not appropriate for the Federal Government to own a single piece of art worth $350 million, particularly given that money could be much better used elsewhere,” says Paterson in the Herald Sun (of course..).  And what should that money be used for? “Given our gross national debt of $470 billion as of this month, my preference would be to use every dollar of the proceeds from selling Blue Poles to pay down debt.”  No words… (More here).

No. Just No.

Pollock’s Love Tokens

Ceramic bookends by Jackson Pollock, 1929

Long before Jackson Pollock revolutionised painting with his signature ‘all-over’ drips, he was a student at the Manual Arts High School in Los Angeles, and it was here that he created the little beauties above.  The unsigned book ends are purportedly love tokens that Pollock fashioned for fellow student Alice Crosby, who recently verified their authenticity. The mulberry streaked slabs are about to go up for auction at Cowan’s in Cincinnati, with an asking price of up to US$15,000.

Pollock’s Love Tokens

New photographs of Jackson Pollock revealed

Tony Vaccaro, 'Jackson and Lee, August 1953', 1953

Previously unseen photographs of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner are about to go on display at the Pollock Krasner House and Study Centre.  Taken by Pollock’s acquaintance Tony Vaccaro (better known for his WWII photographs), the shots were to be included in a Look Magazine article on East Hampton artists that never came to fruition.  While Vaccaro’s colour film was lost, his black and white contact sheets remain intact.  And it is from these that the photographs in the show – many of which have never been seen or printed before – were taken.

Jackson and Lee, August 1953: Photographs by Tony Vaccaro, July 29 – October 30, Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, 830 Springs-Fireplace Road, East Hampton.

New photographs of Jackson Pollock revealed