Category Archives: Artists

Sherman on Franco

Detail from James Franco's New Untitled Film Still 21 (2013); detail from Cindy Sherman's Untitled Film Still 21 (1978)

Detail from James Franco’s ‘New Untitled Film Still 21′ 2013 (left) and detail from Cindy Sherman’s ‘Untitled Film Still 21′ 1978 (right)

Art world darling (and certified creep) James Franco recently launched a new and appallingly bad photo series at Pace Gallery, New York, that riffs on Cindy Sherman’s iconic film stills. “Cindy is an artist who used cinema as a source for her work; she ‘played’ at being an actress” says Franco. “I am an actor who inserts himself into his work. I am fully embedded in Hollywood, but these photos allow me to take a step to the side, look back, and refashion the work I do in Hollywood. I am at the same time actor, critic, artist, and character.” Hmm. When asked about Franco’s appropriations last week, Sherman said: “I was flattered, I can only be flattered. I don’t know that I can say it’s art, but I think it’s weirder that Pace would show them than that he would make them.” Not exactly a glowing endorsement then…

Hot Photo Friday – Matthew Stone

Matthew Stone, from the series 'Body Language', 2009

Matthew Stone, from the series ‘Body Language’, 2009

Some work by Etel Adnan

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McCartney & Hume

A collaboration with Gary Hume from Stella McCartney's latest collection

Drawings by Gary Hume feature in Stella McCartney’s latest collection

Stella McCartney’s latest pre-Fall range includes a collaboration with English painter Gary Hume, who created a series of graphic drawings that were then embroidered onto sweaters and the coat above, amongst other things. You can view more from the range here.

Two Dead Cows

Sidney Nolan, 'Untitled (calf carcass in tree)’, 1952

Sidney Nolan, ‘Untitled (calf carcass in tree)’, 1952

Peter Peryer, 'Dead Steer', 1987

Peter Peryer, ‘Dead Steer’, 1987

Hot Photo Friday – Karlheinz Weinberger

Karlheinz Weinberger, from the series 'Rebel Youth' (1950s-1960s)

Karlheinz Weinberger, from the series ‘Rebel Youth’ (1950s-1960s)

Longo Vids


Robert Longo, best known for his iconic late 1970s series Men in the Cities is another visual artist who tried his hand at making music videos.  He’s the guy behind New Order’s 1986 video for Bizarre Love Triangle (above) and even worked with angry ginge Dave Mustaine from Megadeth on their single Peace Sells (below).

Early in his career, Longo had his own band too.  The artist was the lead singer of Menthol Wars, who performed in New York in the late 1970s.  Below is their very excellent single Even Lower Manhattan, released in 1982 on a Terminal Records compilation called Cleveland Confidential.

Shrigley vs. Armanious

David Shrigley, 'Nailed biscuit', acrylic composite, nail, 2001

David Shrigley, ‘Nailed biscuit’, acrylic composite, nail, 2001

Hany Armanious, 'Coin', cast pigmented polyester resin, cast bronze, 2013

Hany Armanious, ‘Coin’, cast pigmented polyester resin, cast pigmented polyurethan resin, cast bronze, 2013

 

Knobs


Here’s footage of a show by Sarah Lucas at Tramway in Glasgow that contains, among other things, 2.5 metre long sculptural erections, smashed up cars and an enormous wanking hand. LOL has an unashamed penchant for the purile so this show really delivers.  Lucas was interviewed about the exhibition – her first solo in Scotland – by Teddy Jamieson from the Herald Scotland.  Describing her more prurient interests she stated: “I’ve always found the penis a really useful sculptural thing. I’ve always said, ‘When in doubt … knob.’”

(Also worth noting is Tramway’s commitment to video documentation of its exhibitions – an excellent resource for those unable to attend a show in the flesh).

Four More Artists Withdraw from the 19th Biennale of Sydney

After much consideration we: Agnieszka Polska, Sara van der Heide, Nicoline van Harskamp and Nathan Gray, have decided to withdraw our works from the 19th Biennale of Sydney, because of its relation to Transfield, a company involved in the Australian government policy of mandatory detention.

Our motivations reflect those outlined in the statement issued by artists Ögüt, Castro, Ólafsson, Sofo and de Vietri on February 26th, added as a reference with this letter. They close their statement by expressing their hope that others will join them in “solidarity with all those who are working towards a better future for asylum seekers.” Our withdrawal is such an act of solidarity.

We have requested the Biennale that our withdrawal be registered on their website and signposted at the physical site of exhibition, so that this action will not be unnoticed.

With Regards,

Agnieszka Polska, Sara van der Heide,  Nicoline van Harskamp and Nathan Gray

Posted here.