Walter De Maria, Drummer


LOL was sad to learn of the passing of Walter De Maria last week.  While he created significant installations like the New York Earth Room and The Lightning Field (that was immortalised on the cover of Robert Hughes’ key tome American Visions), he’s lesser known for his forays into music.  Heavily entrenched in all manner of 1960s ‘happenings’ in New York, De Maria played with Lou Reed and John Cale in a band called the Primitives, who later went on to become the Velvet Underground.

In a 1972 interview with the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art De Maria described the tug between art and music: “I could have stayed with that band…it was a beautiful, really great band…And it was very tiring to bring all the drums around, and then after playing all night, you couldn’t do anything during the day. I thought, are you going to play or are you going to do the sculpture? You know, are you going to be an artist or a musician?”

Obviously he chose the former, but for a taste of De Maria’s musical side, have a listen to this 1966 recording of ‘Ostrich’, by the Primitives (above).

Walter De Maria, Drummer

One way to get some cash

Superkaleidoscope's patron callout in this weekend's Sydney Morning Herald
Superkaleidoscope’s patron callout in this weekend’s Sydney Morning Herald

Curatorial collective Superkaleidoscope (co-directed by Australian artists Kim Fasher and Sarah Mosca) has taken an old school approach to supporting artists – they’re looking for patrons.  Each month they’ll select one emerging artist to promote, running an advertisement like the one above on their behalf in the Weekend Business section of the Sydney Morning Herald.  If you think you’re deserving of some patronage, you can make a submission to Superkaleidoscope via email.

One way to get some cash

Thailand Gets Its Own Biennale

 

Pattaya Biennale promotional poster
Pattaya Biennale promotional poster

Following in the footsteps of its neighbours Singapore and Indonesia, Thailand is planning a biennale of its own. Launching in late 2014, the country’s first biennale won’t be taking place in the capital.  Rather, the event will be staged in the touristy beach town of Pattaya, an area renowned for its “severe lack of culture”, according to Thasnai Sethaseree, one of three creative practitioners working on the event.   He says; “It’s empty in a sense. Things happen there, but nothing in the creative field. That means we can make something out of this emptiness. There are no constraints.”  The biennale theme and actual dates have not yet been released and will be determined by Sethaseree’s fellow project managers; curators Gridthiya Gaweewong and Pier Luigi Tazzi.  

Thailand Gets Its Own Biennale