On your toes

Christian Loubouton fetish shoes, photographed by David Lynch
Christian Louboutin fetish shoes, photographed by David Lynch, 2007

The Fashion Institute of Technology in New York recently opened a shoe exhibition (if you’re into that sort of thing) to coincide with New York Fashion Week.  Included in the show are a pair of Christian Louboutin’s remarkable fetish shoes.  When Louboutin debuted the range in 2007 he collaborated with none other than David Lynch, who created five limited edition photographs featuring the footwear (see top and below)  and exhibited them at the Galerie du Passage in Paris.

More Lynch-photographed Louboutins
More Lynch-photographed Louboutins

Including ‚Äėsiamese shoes‚Äô bound together by a single heel and 26 cm heels with a spike on the inside, the high fetish collection was complemented by Lynch‚Äôs moody, cinematic images and ambiguous, noir-ish content featuring dancers from the Crazy Horse in Paris.¬† And if these numbers are a little too extreme for your taste, there‚Äôs now the foot friendly¬†Lady Lynch¬†Louboutin, ¬†inspired by the director and yours for US$625.

On your toes

Brilliant cultural initiative unfolds in Brazil

Exterior of the Niteroi Contemporary Art Museum, Brazil (designed by Oscar)
Exterior of the Niteroi Contemporary Art Museum, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (designed by Oscar Niemeyer)

The Brazilian government is implementing an impressive new policy to promote widespread access to the arts.¬† Workers across the country will be provided with a monthly $25 stipend to spend exclusively on cultural pursuits and products ‚Äď covering everything from exhibition entry to movie tickets.

90% of the stipend will be provided by employers, who can deduct the amount from their income tax.  The remaining 10% will be covered by the workers themselves, who can opt out of the scheme if they wish.  While the stipend is predominantly for those on minimum wage, employers can choose to extend payments to staff who earn up to five times that amount. Payment is made via an electronic card, thus restricting spending to arts related goods.

As well as stimulating economic growth in Brazil‚Äôs cultural industries, the move is also emblematic of the government‚Äôs prioritisation of the arts. ¬†Sure $25 isn’t a whole bunch of money in this part of the world (a single ticket to the NGV’s current Neo-Impressionist show will set you back $20), but this is an exciting, empowering and generous way to build more diverse audiences and an appetite for art.

Brilliant cultural initiative unfolds in Brazil